DESCRIPTION: EADS Barracuda

Image result for EADS Barracuda

The EADS Barracuda is a jet powered European unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) currently under development by EADS, intended for the role of aerial reconnaissance and also combat.  The aircraft is a joint venture between Germany and Spain.

Development of the project was stopped after the first prototype crashed at sea while approaching for landing during a test flight. The program was resumed in 2008, with a second prototype being completed in November 2008. The rebuilt Barracuda underwent a series of successful flight tests in Goose Bay, Canada during July 2009, followed by further flight campaigns in 2010 and 2012.

The Barracuda is primarily in competition with the Dassault nEUROn for strategic and defensive contracts. Both are stealthy and have a maximum air speed of around Mach 0.85 . While Germany and Spain are behind the Barracuda, France, Italy, Sweden, Switzerland, Greece and Spain, are funding the nEUROn. Not much is known about the Barracuda as it is still in development. However the Barracuda is thought to have an operating ceiling of around 20,000 ft (6,096 m) and carries a maximum payload of 300 kg.

Specifications

General characteristics

  • Crew: 0
  • Length: 8.25 m (27 ft 0 in)
  • Wingspan: 7.22 m (23.7 ft in)
  • Height: ft in (m)
  • Wing area: ft (m)
  • Empty weight: 2300 kg (lb)
  • Useful load: lb (kg)
  • Loaded weight: kg (lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 3250 kg (lb)

Performance

  • Never exceed speed: mph (km/h)
  • Maximum speed: 0.85 Mach (647 mph)
  • Cruise speed: mph (km/h)
  • Stall speed: mph (km/h)
  • Range: 124 mi (200 km)
  • Service ceiling: ±20,000 ft (6100 m)
  • Rate of climb: ft/min (m/s)
  • Wing loading: lb/ft² (kg/m²)
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s