NEWS: Drone Delivery Service Develops For Commercial Industries

Technology is developing. More and more devices and machines are becoming “smart.” With connection to the internet, they connect to each other and present endless opportunities.

Robot delivery has climbed high on the tech development agenda.

Catching the attention of headlines and Super Bowl fans, drone delivery services are swiftly approaching the commercial market. Amazon has taken the lead in this development race and gave a 10-second sneak peek teaser of “Prime Air.”

In December, drone delivery made its first successful go-round in a rural corner of England, where it has been beta-testing. Carrying up to five pounds, drones can deliver in under 30 minutes. In the future, nearby drone delivery warehouses will provide thousands of product options.

With vertically rising drones flying up to 400 feet in the air, the sky is no longer the limit.

 

THE PROCESS OF DRONE DELIVERY

Though not quite ready, Amazon promised it would be available “soon.” But after the successful beta-tests in England, drone confidence is rising.

Amazon’s speedy delivery service “Prime Now” is already offered in select markets. While these deliveries can be made in under an hour, the service depends on human drivers. Which also makes it subject to traffic conditions.

Battery-operated delivery drones can travel about 15 miles away. They have the ability to sense and avoid both air and land-based obstacles. Using a GPS system, the delivery drones can quickly generate the best route and even communicate with each other.

Like so much of today’s tech operations, users can use communicate with delivery drones via smart phones. Users can use their smart phone to select delivery options such as: “Bring it to Me,” “Home,” “Work,” and “My Boat.” Additionally, if the customer relocates, the drones can redirect mid-route.

While apartment buildings are still a bit complicated for drone routes, doorstep delivery throughout neighborhoods has been easily mastered.

Amazon has invested nearly $1.5 billion to create an air cargo hub in Kentucky for further drone development. The project will provide over 2,000 jobs to work on aero plane development.

Though giant screen TV’s will still require a typical truck delivery, special drone warehouses will make selections from tech gadgets to movie snacks quickly available. However, as drone weight options increase through future development, their useful applications will extend far beyond simple convenience deliveries.

 

THE FEDEX DELIVERY SERVICE RIVALRY

Right now Amazon holds a clear lead in futuristic delivery services. The leading online retailer made a smart move with the Super Bowl commercial snippets. They’re an excellent delivery service with a winning online medium between buyers and suppliers.

Now FedEx is clamoring for attention, working to gain grounds in delivery services.

FedEx wants to increase their user-friendliness in delivery. They have just announced an e-commerce solution for integrated supply chain distribution. They’re providing a logistics network for small and medium-sized businesses in special warehouse storing.

Their focus is on improved automation. As a third-party logistics provider, FedEx transports packages to businesses and consumer’s doorsteps cheaply.  The e-commerce delivery service has cultivated a reputation for reliability.

FedEx is delivering products for companies that have already developed their own online presence, so their improvement approaches have been a bit different. Logo specialization has recently been made available to businesses. While their products are shipping from FedEx warehouses, these companies now have the option to have packages shipped with their unique logo.

FedEx’s chief information officer, Rob Carter, has recently announced emerging AI and robotics tech initiatives. Part of that investment focuses on autonomous truck driving development, which could completely reshape FedEx delivery.

Your FedEx package may someday be delivered by a robot.

Whether its Amazon, FedEx or Uber, autonomous delivery and transportation technologies are developing fast.

Guest Contribution by Allison Crady, a Marketing Specialist for a commercial construction conglomerate, including CDF Distributors and Fast Partitions. She spends most of her time researching and writing about a myriad of industry topics, including innovative construction, home improvement, urban trends, and city planning.

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